Ashes 1882: The Birth

August 29, 1882. The on-field gamesmanship of WG Grace so incensed Fred Spofforth that it produced a bowling spell that scorched The Oval. As the English batting was cremated in the fire, The Ashes came into being. Arunabha Sengupta looks back at the day that gave birth to the most famous and enduring of all cricketing rivalries.

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Ashes 1921: Old Archie MacLaren's amateurs defeat Warwick Armstrong's mighty men

Many an armchair fan may have examined the performance of a national side and boasted “my team could beat them”, safe in the knowledge that they’ll never be required to prove it. Michael Jones looks back to August 30, 1921, when the former England captain Archie MacLaren claimed that he could pick a team to defeat the all-conquering Australian side — and did so.

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Ashes 1905: Bosanquet helps win a race against time and light

England won the race against time and light in a finish laced with excitement and pathos. Arunabha Sengupta writes about the game that saw the best innings of Archie MacLaren, one of the pioneering spells of match-winning googly bowling by Bernard Bosanquet and the desperate attempt by Victor Trumper to get to the crease.

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Ashes 1986-87: Allan Border and Greg Ritchie put Adelaide to sleep

The 1960s had witnessed perhaps the most boring days in the history of the sport, even Ashes contests. Things changed in the 1970s and 1980s, more so following the advent of limited-overs cricket. There was, however, the occasional yawnathon, but few as bizarre as what happened on December 16, 1986, when Allan Border and Greg Ritchie put Adelaide Oval to sleep despite the fact that they were trailing in the series. Abhishek Mukherjee recollects a morbid day of Test cricket.

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